Whitneyville Fall Social November 29 at 7 pm at the Library

Join us for a post-Thanksgiving neighborhood gathering at the Whitneyville Branch Library to enjoy a book reading, light refreshments, and nourishing conversations with your friends and neighbors.  

Bruce Coffin, who gave a poetry reading last fall as part of our “Evening in the Stacks” series, is back by popular demand to read from his memoir about growing up in Vermont.

September 2018 Meeting Notes

September 20, 2018 Meeting Notes

Welcome. This meeting was held at the Children’s Center of Hamden, 1400 Whitney Avenue. President Dave Bechtel called the meeting to order about 7:10.  He welcomed everyone and thanked the Children’s Center for hosting the meeting and providing the snacks and beverages.

Announcements:

  • Michael Ross has resigned as Chair of the Library Committee
  • At the Board of Ed Operations committee meeting on Monday, September 24, there will be a presentation of the revised report from the consultants working on “Rethink, Restructure, Revise” plan for Hamden schools. The meeting will be at 7:00 pm at the Hamden Middle School.
  • There will be a Town-Wide Forum on LED Streetlights – Sat. Sept. 29, 2-4pm, Hamden High School. Room C-107.

 Committee Updates.  WCA committee updates included:

  • Music Committee. Dave reviewed the very well attended summer 2018 series. He also reported that Jan Kazienko, who has chaired the music committee for several years has resigned and Deidre Dolan will be the new chair. New committee members are always welcome so think about it and watch for meeting announcements later this year.
  •  Library Committee: WCA vice president Connie Mattheson reported that in July, the Committee members presented a check to the Library Director and Board for $2,350, proceeds from the Books and Booze fundraiser for the Whitneyville Branch Library. The Committee will meet in October to make plans for this year’s events and to choose a new chair.  Any new members are welcome.

Program:  Dave introduced the program, noting that the Children’s Center is a very visible part of our community and yet many of us don’t really know what they do.  He introduced Dan Lyga (Chief Executive Officer), and turned the program over to Dan.  Dan introduced Cheryl Smith (Chief Operating Officer), Sarah Lockery (Director of Development and Community Relations) and Detective Stephen Rossacci (Hamden Police Department liaison to the Children’s Center).

Dan started with the history of the Children’s Center, showing the evolution of locations and services provided for the past 185 years:

  • 1833: Began as an orphanage, New Haven Orphan Asylum, the first child caring facility in Connecticut;
  • 1925: Moved to current location in Hamden;
  • 1940’s-50’s: Added medical care for children with polio;
  • Served as adoption agency for a period of time;
  • 1960’s – 1980’s: Added treatment for children with behavioral health and substance abuse issues: and
  • 1990’s – 2005: Provided services and treatment with heavy emphasis on residential treatment. (100+ youth sleeping onsite and 45 day-program slots.)

Cheryl provided more detail on the programs and services provided in recent years and helped us understand how the evolution of research and theories of treatment impact what services and programs the Center provides.

  • Currently (2018) has 47 beds and almost 100 served in day programs. This clearly demonstrates the shift from congregate care to day programs since 2005.
  • Currently there are nine discreet programs currently administered by the Children’s Center.
  • Program types vary from Clinical Day school, to Outpatient Substance Abuse to Crisis Stabilization and full Residential Treatment.
  • The number of clients, the age ranges, and the gender vary by program.
  • The average stay varies from 3 days to 12 months and one small group home serves adult women as long as needed.
  • The Center also offers a number of programs for the children in addition to treatment and school. These include culinary arts, music and a gardening/ healthy eating / farmers’ market activity.

Detective Rossacci explained his role as police liaison officer.  He discussed his types of engagement and interaction with the children and the Center and clarified what the police can and cannot do:

  • Clarified laws regarding stopping juveniles. Per a 2005 law, staff at the Children’s Center are not allowed by law to physically restrain youth from leaving unless they are a threat to themselves or others.  That is why people may see staff following a young person trying to convince them to return to the Center.
  • Shared broader juvenile justice problems seen statewide, including auto thefts related to gang activities and how police departments are responding.
  • The Children’s Center has been partnering with Hamden Police Department – assigning an additional officer in the neighborhood every evening starting at 6 pm. The officer checks in with the 24-hour onsite supervisor and is the first point of contact for any concerns from The Children’s Center or the 911 operator in Hamden.
  • Steve repeatedly encouraged everyone to call the police, any time you see something that doesn’t seem right – whether related to the Children’s Center or not.

Dan opened up the floor for questions and a very engaged audience responded.  For almost an hour, Dan, Cheryl, Steve and Sarah answered questions. The conversation and discussions ranged from very specific questions about the Children’s Center of Hamden to the broader topics of children’s services and juvenile justice, nationally or at the State level in Connecticut.

Information was shared about Connecticut state departments that were, or are, involved including the Department of Children and Families (DCF) and the Division of Court Support Services (CSSD).  The team explained how these are evolving at our State level and what has happened in the past year, what is happening now, what is not happening that should be.

  • The closing of Connecticut Juvenile Training School (CJTS) resulted in lack of locked juvenile facilities in the state. The State did not plan adequately before closing the facility. The responsibility shifted responsibility from DCF to CSSD.
  • The State issued a request for proposals (RFP) for private facilities to meet the need for approximately 60 beds. Only one response was received and it was not acceptable.  The state is drafting a new RFP.  Juveniles impacted currently held in prisons or are being referred to other programs across the state.
  • The Children’s Center did not submit an RFP. They do not have the appropriate facility for the population from CJTS or those juveniles requiring a locked facility. The Children’s Center does not plan to serve that population. In the interim, they have been asked to take clients and these will be considered on a case by case basis and will not be accepted until a full assessment has been completed.

What has the Children’s Center done in addition to the relationship with the police?

  • Instituted monthly meetings with community, police, and elected officials. (This meeting is one of the results of those meetings.)
  • Installed additional cameras in common areas.
  • Installed delayed crash bars on doors in cottages with frequent runaways.
  • Is using special activities/trips, etc. as incentives.
  • Created work programs for youth.

Where do we go from here?

  • Communicate your questions and concerns – the sooner the better. Ideas and suggestions welcome.  Call or email The Children’s Center any time:
  • Cheryl Smith at csmith@tccoh.org or 203-248-2116 x269.
  • Dan Lyga at dlyga@tccoh.org or 203-248-2116 x202
  • Any time day or night, you can call the 24-hour Supervisor On Site at 203-627-2273.
  • Rossacci urged residents to call 911 if there is an immediate concern about crime (rather than the Children’s Center). “We’re here to serve you.”
  • Advocate for a full continuum of care at the state level. Speak to and write your legislators – state and local.  “We know the economy is a huge issue, but how are we making sure our youth and our communities are safe?”

It was agreed that the meetings which include the Children’s Center, the police, community groups and local elected officials will continue. Information about the Children’s Center and advocacy opportunities will be shared by newsletters, on websites and social media and in future WCA meetings as necessary or appropriate.

Adjournment.  The meeting was adjourned at 9:05 pm.

Town-Wide Forum on LED Lights, Lighting, Health, Safety, and Science

 

Saturday, September 29th 2:00-4:00 at Hamden High School Room C107, 2040 Dixwell Ave, Hamden

Leading experts will present the current best practice in roadway lighting to protect human health, public safety, ecosystems, and quality of life. The forum will raise awareness about the difference between LED lighting and older, High Pressure Sodium and incandescent light sources, and will address the issues surrounding the upcoming installation of LED streetlights in the town of Hamden.

The panel will include of Professor of Community Medicine and Health Care: Dr. Richard Stevens of UConn, Catherine Diviney; Town of West Hartford Energy Specialist, Leo Smith; member Roadway Lighting Committee (Illuminating Engineering Society), Christina Crowder; International Dark-Sky Association, and on hand to answer specific question regarding regulations and safety; Daniel Kops, Hamden Town Planner and Hamden Police Chief, Thomas Wydra.

Speakers will present the latest information regarding the potential environmental, health, safety and community issues surrounding the upcoming installation of LED street lighting in Hamden and to outdoor lighting in general. In addition, the forum will have guideposts to systems, solutions and goals, that residents of the Town of Hamden should work to achieve.

Panelist will speak to their specialty, have a panel discussion and open the floor to questions.

Sponsored by Hamden Low-K LED Alliance (https://www.facebook.com/groups/CTLowKLED/ ), State Representative Michael D’Agostino, 91st District, Office of Mayor Curt Leng and the Connecticut Chapter of the International Dark-Sky Association.

Summer Music at Denicola Park

Our summer music concerts conclude on August 8 with classical music by local youth musicians.  The concert is at Denicola Park on Treadwell Street.  Bring chairs, blankets, food and drink.  Music is from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm.  Lots of room for the kids to play and enjoy the music!

Thanks to our generous sponsors — and local gems — Framed and Wine 101!